Tag Archives: technical diving

Maximum Operating Depth (part 2)

scuba cylinders markings

As I said earlier, it is vital to analyse your diving cylinders prior to go out diving. It is so important that there is a sort of ‘accepted’ way of doing it while keeping the KISS principle. Keeping it Super Simple so easy to read and identify as to avoid any confusion.

Unless you have a Marking Identification Team like this one, be careful!! 🙂

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Technical Diving with Razor Sidemount System

Adventure in Technical Diving with RSM

Since my last post, lots of things have happened. I’ve been out of Mexico for the last month and a half and been training and teaching in tech diving Techwise Malta. Continue reading

Overhead Diver Training

Deco Stop or physical ceiling?

When scuba diving, we are limited in how fast we can come up to the surface, due to dissolved gas in our body and sometimes, we even have to stop for few minutes, to off-gas or do a decompression stop.
The similarity with this type of technical diving and overhead diving seat in our obligation to consider a ceiling that we cannot break or go through physically.

Buoyancy then trim and finally, the frog kick!

According to our dear online encyclopedia, there are four types of overhead diving: cave diving, deep, ice or wreck diving.
Due to its very demanding environment, cave diving is probably the most challenging forme of technical diving, along with deep trimix exploration dives. Continue reading

Sidemount diving vs Backmounted doubles

Fun dives vs established rules?!?

Let me tell you this, I am not a big fan of established rules and on one side it is good that not everybody think like me and on the other side it helps me put my point across!

As you may have realised, if you follow the scuba diving industry news, that sidemount scuba diving is becoming very popular. More than a trend who is called to fade out in time, I think it is a way of life or should I say, a way of diving.

Better redundancy in sidemount!

Couple of PADI courses are out there already and whoever tries it claim it is a revelation. More fun, more practical, easier to get to, as doubles are not as available as would be a pair of singles and also offers real redundancy.

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Buoyancy, Trim and Propulsion

Buoyancy, Trim and Propulsion, in that order.

Like any physical activity, scuba diving is demanding and requires a certain level of fitness to enjoy it safely. We could stress that physiological preparedness is the main core of scuba diving, so trim, buoyancy and propulsion are the essential skills needed for its practice.

To get a good trim, you need rock solid buoyancy skills.

Divers often forget the impact on the environment from which they have evolved. Although the practice of the sport was founded on exploration of the aquatic realm from a conservation point of view, the skills needed today for a more sustainable scuba diving practice are on many diver’s minds.
Much of the diving community is aware of the need for more responsible diving.
There is much more interest these days in technical diving, overhead diving, including prestigious cave diving, and voodoo deep gas diving.
Although some of these have been practiced for a long time in some circles, the demand from recreational divers is increasing.
New agencies have been set up to support a more established and strict set of training standards.

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